Biochemistry, yeah!

19. 1st year biochemist at the University of York (UK)!
This is mainly just a way of expanding my knowledge of biochemistry, so feel free to correct me on anything as I mostly teach myself the topics before posting anything!
Ask me

Structure of swine influenza virus showing different type of antigens present on and inside the capsid, including hemagglutnin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA)

Structure of swine influenza virus showing different type of antigens present on and inside the capsid, including hemagglutnin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA)

labratwoman said: I'm a biochem major, and I love your blog! I'm starting up an immunology tumblr, effyeahimmunology. Would you mind checking it out, and maybe help get the word out?

Thank you!

I followed :) here is the link for any of my followers: effyeahimmunology

I’m off to university this Sunday so I hope to be posting a lot more, as a way of revision. Woop, stay tuned.

cute-science:

Amanita phalloides, the Death Cap mushroom, is one of the deadliest poisonous mushrooms and is responsible for most mushroom-related deaths. This is because the toxin produced by the mushroom, α-amanitin, is a cyclic peptide that reacts enzymatically within the cell by inhibiting RNA polymerase II. Without active RNA polymerase II, the cell is unable to synthesize RNA molecules that are important precursors to protein formation. Death is slow and takes a week on average after ingestion to occur.

(via cute-science-deactivated2011102)

(Source: eezie)

onparadigmshifts:

Central Dogma of Biology
Sequential information is transferred (or transcribed) residue by residue from DNA to RNA in every cell’s nucleus. The corresponding RNA is then modified to varying degrees, and transported out of the nucleus into the cytoplasm, where the genetic sequence is translated (via ribosomes) to make proteins.
DNA and RNA are nucleic acids, or long polymers made of of singular units calls nucleotides. A unit of three sequential nucleotides in a messenger RNA molecule is called a codon, and each codon codes for a single amino acid in the protein. Proteins are often made up of thousands or hundreds of thousands of amino acids.
The central dogma also states that the process cannot operate in reverse; proteins cannot be used to create RNA or DNA.
The central dogma is the single most important aspect of molecular biology.

In his 1988 autobiography, What Mad Pursuit, Francis Crick wrote about his choice of the word “dogma” and some of the problems it caused him:
I called this idea the “central dogma,” for two reasons, I suspect. I had already used the obvious word “hypothesis” in the sequence hypothesis, and in addition I wanted to suggest that this new assumption was more central and more powerful. … As it turned out, the use of the word dogma caused almost more trouble than it was worth…. Many years later Jacques Monod pointed out to me that I did not appear to understand the correct use of the word dogma, which is a belief that cannot be doubted. I did apprehend this in a vague sort of way but since I thought that all religious beliefs were without foundation, I used the word the way I myself thought about it, not as most of the world does, and simply applied it to a grand hypothesis that, however plausible, had little direct experimental support.
via

onparadigmshifts:

Central Dogma of Biology

Sequential information is transferred (or transcribed) residue by residue from DNA to RNA in every cell’s nucleus. The corresponding RNA is then modified to varying degrees, and transported out of the nucleus into the cytoplasm, where the genetic sequence is translated (via ribosomes) to make proteins.

DNA and RNA are nucleic acids, or long polymers made of of singular units calls nucleotides. A unit of three sequential nucleotides in a messenger RNA molecule is called a codon, and each codon codes for a single amino acid in the protein. Proteins are often made up of thousands or hundreds of thousands of amino acids.

The central dogma also states that the process cannot operate in reverse; proteins cannot be used to create RNA or DNA.

The central dogma is the single most important aspect of molecular biology.

In his 1988 autobiographyWhat Mad Pursuit, Francis Crick wrote about his choice of the word “dogma” and some of the problems it caused him:

I called this idea the “central dogma,” for two reasons, I suspect. I had already used the obvious word “hypothesis” in the sequence hypothesis, and in addition I wanted to suggest that this new assumption was more central and more powerful. … As it turned out, the use of the word dogma caused almost more trouble than it was worth…. Many years later Jacques Monod pointed out to me that I did not appear to understand the correct use of the word dogma, which is a belief that cannot be doubted. I did apprehend this in a vague sort of way but since I thought that all religious beliefs were without foundation, I used the word the way I myself thought about it, not as most of the world does, and simply applied it to a grand hypothesis that, however plausible, had little direct experimental support.

via

(Source: independentassortment)

The image above shows an example of an amphiphile which is a term used to describe a chemical compound that contains both lipophilic (fat-loving) and hydrophilic (water-loving) properties.
A common and important class of amphiphillic molecules include phospholipids, which are the main component of cell membranes. The amphiphillic nature of these molecules actually defines the way in which the cell membrane is arranged. The arrangement of polar hydrophilic groups on the outside, so as to interact with the aqueous environment and non-polar lipophilic groups on the inside, away from the aqueous environment, hence forms the basis of the bilayer. 

The image above shows an example of an amphiphile which is a term used to describe a chemical compound that contains both lipophilic (fat-loving) and hydrophilic (water-loving) properties.

A common and important class of amphiphillic molecules include phospholipids, which are the main component of cell membranes. The amphiphillic nature of these molecules actually defines the way in which the cell membrane is arranged. The arrangement of polar hydrophilic groups on the outside, so as to interact with the aqueous environment and non-polar lipophilic groups on the inside, away from the aqueous environment, hence forms the basis of the bilayer.